They call me KJ. My blog is an awkward mix of serious issues, hot people, and musicals. With a bunch of gay superheroes thrown in. I'm 20, I'm White, I'm Queer, I'm Hearing Impaired, and I like cats. I prefer "they, their" etc. Occasionally NSFW.

Kaye is the Sam to my Dean and the Doctor to my Jack and my soul twin.

I made a Flight Rising side blog.

 

thecreepylittlegirl:

You can’t pick and choose what parts of feminism you want. You can’t support your queer sisters but not your trans sisters. You can’t support your fat sisters but not your sisters of colour. Being a feminist means creating a positive and equal space for women. The second you start excluding women based on which characteristics you do or do not find appealing you have defeated the whole point of being a feminist.

zevransbutt:

ok so theres this poc assassin right
he has a half pony tail and a lil braid thingy going on 
i luv him v much and his fanbase is my family
he is part of an institutionally oppressed minority who had their land taken away by white men
somehow his creators forgot about him and how important he is to the plot and the state of the world in the universe in which he exists

am i talking about zevran aranai or ratohnhnaké:ton

humansofnewyork:

Before I return to New York portraits, I want to share some portraits and stories that I gathered on an unscheduled side trip that I took to Jerusalem. Because of the hastily arranged nature of the trip, I worked with some unorthodox interpreters, including an extremely bright sixteen year old Palestinian boy. He approached everyone quite confidently, until we got to this group, and suddenly he got fidgety and clammed up. “Um, I don’t know,” he said. “They, um, will probably say no, um, maybe we should ask someone else.”
(Jerusalem)

humansofnewyork:

Before I return to New York portraits, I want to share some portraits and stories that I gathered on an unscheduled side trip that I took to Jerusalem. Because of the hastily arranged nature of the trip, I worked with some unorthodox interpreters, including an extremely bright sixteen year old Palestinian boy. He approached everyone quite confidently, until we got to this group, and suddenly he got fidgety and clammed up. “Um, I don’t know,” he said. “They, um, will probably say no, um, maybe we should ask someone else.”

(Jerusalem)

Anonymous asked
I have been HOH since I was born and use hearing aids. I was raised in the hearing world as no one in my family is HOH. A few days ago a woman who noticed I had hearing aids was signing to me. Thing is, I don't know sign language and she was deaf so there was no way for us to communicate. It makes me feel isolated from both the hearing and deaf world. It's probably stupid to ask this but I was just wondering if I'm not the only HOH who doesn't know sign language and if that is a bad thing.

thehoh-society:

Truthfully, I really don’t think you are.  I think there are probably more HOH people who don’t know sign language rather than those who don’t.  It’s kind of odd to think about, isn’t it?  I mean, consider all the people without access to the HOH/Deaf communities or any means of learning sign language.  Also, think about those who lose their hearing later on in life. 

That sounds like an awkward situation to be placed in.  I can see how it’d make one feel even more isolated, like there’s something you should be doing that you aren’t.  Is there anyone on here that can relate? 

Hello! I am HOH and don’t know sign language. It’s something I’ve always felt really bad about, and want to learn. Unfortunately, I can’t take the ASL class at my college because my GPA isn’t high enough. Apparently I won’t have enough personal stake in it to do well! =D It’s not necessarily a bad thing, since I can hear and be understood well enough to get by, but I totally understand you.